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President Joe Biden's popularity is declining, compared to Trump's

 President Joe Biden's popularity is declining, compared to Trump's

Even as Americans voted in record numbers early on Wednesday across battleground states from which Mr. Biden defeated the incumbent Donald Trump, he still only has a 52% support rating versus 56% for Mr. Trump. It is not necessarily a surprise given that the election was close with thousands more votes still being counted. In fact, most surveys have concluded that Mr. Trump has gained even more supporters since Monday leading up to this weekend’s presidential debate. Some are attributing it to people who did not vote because they wanted both candidates to win but instead wanted Mr. Biden’s “good” policies for future growth.

President Joe Biden's popularity is declining, compared to Trump's
President Joe Biden's popularity is declining, compared to Trump's

While many people remain undecided, there appeared to be little doubt at all on how the elections would turn out in an expected final tally that is still too small to reliably predict. However, despite everything else going wrong on Capitol Hill, and while voter turnout dropped dramatically over the past week, several polls had already projected Democrat candidate for president Joe Biden as president-elect before Election Day. As such the Democratic electorate seemed poised to deliver Joe Biden their mandate, with Mr. Biden likely to be sworn in as president on January 20. But while President Trump continues to make baseless claims that he won, one major swing state in Pennsylvania is yet to release any official results, leaving Mr. Trump to continue claiming victory.

President Joe Biden's popularity is declining, compared to Trump's


Mr. Biden’s popularity decreased slightly after he was named Vice President-Elect, down to 53%. That number may change by the time voters cast their ballots in November. While some polls were predicting Democrats would take back seats in Congress, Republicans held four seats, and Republicans were in control of the Senate. So in total, Democrats lost six seats and Republicans gained three seats in Senate race races.


President Joe Biden's popularity is declining, compared to Trump's
President Joe Biden's popularity is declining, compared to Trump's


The result in the House also appears to be another blow to Republicans. The Republican delegation lost four seats. While Democrats increased their representation by 15 to 221 seats. Meanwhile, Republicans increased from 206 to 223 seats. This may sound like a good thing considering that House Democrats gained 6 seats while House Republicans saw 1 seat gain. According to FiveThirtyEight, Republicans saw a 6% increase in popular-vote margins, compared to Democrats, increasing them by 2%. This could mean the two parties will see larger majorities in November.


President Joe Biden's popularity is declining, compared to Trump's


President Trump may be losing his reelection bid, but analysts believe his popular-vote margin could still stay relatively large. With 95 million eligible American adults having cast their ballot so far, this should be a solid indication of where America intends to go under the next president.

President Joe Biden's popularity is declining, compared to Trump's
President Joe Biden's popularity is declining, compared to Trump's
If Mr. Trump manages to pull off a convincing upset and take him back into office, President Biden could become the first Democrat to win the White House in 70 years. Also, this could be a sign of where Democrats are heading. While some believed President Trump would take over the Whitehouse as he did during Barack Obama's term as president, other experts believe his presidency might lead to a new era of progressive rule that may give Democrats more power in Washington. But for now, Biden will be watching what happens in the coming weeks.

President Joe Biden's popularity is declining, compared to Trump's

The outcome of the presidential race between Joe Biden and Donald Trump can be seen as a lesson to other politicians on how to run campaigns to ensure we get the best outcomes possible. Mr. Trump does not seem to understand the importance of winning at least some of these early primaries before getting down to the actual hard work of building trust with our electorate. He has claimed that the media is biased against him, or that the DNC rigged the elections for Hillary Clinton in 2016, and therefore he needs to make sure these polls do not represent him. His campaign manager Brad Parscale said it would be a mistake if he didn't focus his efforts on rebuilding his brand and making sure Americans feel he cares after 4 years of chaos and failed leadership. Unfortunately, this seems to be a bit harder said than done when faced with someone with such a powerful position. Hopefully, in the end, Democrats and Republicans can agree to share the reigns of politics once again.

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